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7 Colorful DIY Dream Catchers for Kids

With these modern dream catcher DIY ideas, your kids can create the room decoration of their dreams.

By: Chelsea Scarnegie, Editor, AllFreeKidsCrafts.com

DIY Dream Catchers for Kids
DIY Dream Catchers for Kids
This image courtesy of AllFreeKidsCrafts.com

These dream catcher patterns are a great way to teach your kids about Native American culture any time of the year. Your children will have tons of fun making any of these 7 Colorful DIY Dream Catchers for Kids. With these easy dream catchers, your kids can get creative and spruce up your home with their creations. They will have a blast learning how a simple dream catcher can make unique decorations that they can show off to their family and friends. Help your little ones add splashes of color to the home with all of these fun decorative crafts! And while you're making these unique crafts with your children, be sure to share some beautiful Native American legends with our dream catcher history below.

8 DIY Dream Catchers

  1. Woven CD DIY Dreamcatcher - Help your kids make a CD craft that will encourage them to branch out and try new materials and techniques. This Woven CD DIY Dreamcatcher will teach your kids to weave and leave them itching to try some more.

  2. Summer Days DIY Dream Catcher - Kids can literally catch their dreams this summer with this cool Summer Days DIY Dream Catcher craft. Let your kids chase away scary nightmares by designing their own colorful and custom kids' craft.

  3. Dreamy Lace Dream Catcher - If you're having trouble sleeping, which happens to everyone, catch your troubles in the Dreamy Lace Dream Catcher. You'll never sleep so soundly and have such sweet dreams as when you make your own dream catcher and hang it above your bed.

  4. Dreamy Dreamcatcher - You will most definitely be having sweet dreams with this beautiful craft hanging above your bed. The Dreamy Dreamcatcher is the best way to catch your biggest wishes and your greatest decorating desires.

  5. Giant Dream Catcher - For the biggest dreams don't just make a dream catcher; make a Giant Dream Catcher. This craft is easy, cheap, and tons of fun to make.

  6. Sweet Dreams Beaded Dream Catcher - It'll be sweet dreams and deep sleep from now on with this Sweet Dreams Beaded Dream Catcher craft. Learn how to make a dream catcher to snare those nightmares for good.

  7. Rainbow Dream Catcher - Let this Rainbow Dream Catcher capture and hide your kids' bad dreams. Nature crafts for kids are always fun to make.

Dream Catcher History

Dream catchers are sacred to Native American culture and are traditionally made from a ring of willow and held together by a web of sinew or fiber that connect to the ring in eight places. They are used to encourage good dreams, although various tribes have differing lore as they teach their children about dream catchers. Below are some history and legends for you to pass along to your own kids as you make dream catchers together. 

  1. Native Americans teach that the nighttime air is filled with both dreams and nightmares. When you hang a dream catcher over or near your bed, it catches the dreams as they drift through the night. If the dream is good, it will know how to pass through the holes of the dream catcher and softly reach the sleeper. Nightmares, however, get caught and vanish in the morning light.

  2. Traditional dream catchers are made with a hoop of willow and decorated with bits and pieces of everyday Native American life, like feathers, arrowheads, and beads.

  3. According to Ojibwa legend, the dream catcher’s circular shape represents how giizis (the sun) travels across the sky each day. Its appearance is modeled after a spider’s web, as Asibikaashi (the Spider Woman) was the one who helped bring giizis back to the people using her own web. Therefore, each dream catcher should have eight points where the web connects to the hoop to represent Asibikaashi’s legs.

  4. According to Lakota legend, it is the good dreams which are caught in the web and carried to the dream catcher’s owner to enjoy. The nightmares, on the other hand, pass through the hole in the center and do not bother the sleeper. In order for the dream catcher to work, the user must believe in the Great Spirit and the destiny of their future.

  5. A feather was traditionally placed in the center of the dream catcher to symbolize breath or air, which is essential for life. An owl’s feather represented wisdom, and an eagle’s feather represented courage. Nowadays, it is illegal to use these feathers in salable crafts, so modern Native Americans replace the feathers with four gem stones, which symbolize the four directions.

  6. Because dream catchers are made of willow and sinew, they do not last, as the willow dries out and the sinew’s tension collapses. Their temporary nature symbolizes the passing of youth into adulthood. When adults use dream catchers, their dream catchers consist of woven fiber, which represents the maturity of their dreams. In many parts of Canada and the Northeastern United States, dream catchers are shaped like a teardrop or a snowshoe.

What is your biggest dream? Tell us below!

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I used to love making my own dream catchers! I'm going to try to make these with my little cousins the next time I babysit them.

These are such fun ideas. I just redid my daughter's room in an Aztec theme and hung a dream catcher from the ceiling. If she could make her own, though that would be so fun.

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